The next UK General Election will be held on 4 July 2024
 

In an election, you can vote for your local and national representatives. Typically, you'll vote in general elections and local elections.

As a student, it's important that you use your vote and get your voice heard.


Don't have photo ID?

If you don't have suitable photo ID, NUS are providing a photo ID from CitizenCard for free (usually £18) using the code 'NUS' at checkout.


Why should students care about voting?

Your vote can influence policies affecting education, housing, and employment.

Your vote can ensure your voice is heard and your interests are represented.

Your vote can effect change, hold politicians accountable, and protect your rights.

Your vote can shape your future and the future of your country.

Prepare to vote

  1. Register to vote

    You must register to vote to be able to have your say in UK elections.

    Register and check eligibility

  2. Get photo ID

    You'll need specific photo ID to vote in person or to vote as a proxy to someone else.

    Check photo ID requirements

  3. Cast your vote

    Familiarise yourself with what to expect on the day and how to cast your vote; in person, by proxy, or via postal vote.

    Learn how to vote on the day

International student?

If you're an international student studying in the UK, you may be eligible to vote in UK elections.

Guide to voting as an international student


We can't tell you who to vote for, but we can tell you it's important to be as informed as possible when casting your vote.

Typically, voters choose representatives whose views align with their own.

Based on our knowledge about what's most important to Hallam students, we'd suggest looking into the following topics:

  • General Cost of Living support
  • Maintenance loan increase and revival of the maintenance grant
  • International student VISA support
  • Transport affordability
  • Renter reform

You can check your MP's current stance on these topics and find out where each political party stands on a variety of other issues.

  • See how each MP voted on specific historic issues
  • Attend a local hustings event to see MP candidates debate and answer questions from their constituents. If you've not heard enough about things that matter to you, make sure you attend and submit a question. We'll update this webpage with any hustings events we know about!