Blog

  • Fri 14 Sep 2018 11:35

    Suitcase

    Scotland’s picturesque capital city is a popular tourist destination. Thousands of people visit every year for the popular Fringe Festival - which sold over 2.5 million tickets in 2017! - but there’s plenty to see and do outside of the festival season as well.

     

    National Museum of Scotland

    One of the most visited museums in the world, the National Museum of Scotland is home to a fascinating and diverse range of exhibits. Whether you’re interested in the natural world, history or science, there’s something for everyone to discover.

     

    Website: https://www.nms.ac.uk/national-museum-of-scotland/

     

    Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

    The buildings and grounds of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art are beautiful enough in themselves; not to mention the huge range of artwork inside! Work from artists such as Pablo Picasso, Francis Bacon and Tracy Emin are on display in the permanent collection, and there are always a number of temporary exhibitions to explore too.

     

    Website: https://www.nationalgalleries.org/visit/scottish-national-gallery-modern-art

     

    Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

    If the weather is on your side, why not take a stroll around the Royal Botanic Garden? It’s close to the city centre, and covers over 70 acres. There’s plenty to see, from giant redwood trees to an authentic Victorian Glasshouse, and it’s a great place to relax away from the city centre.

     

    Website: http://www.rbge.org.uk/the-gardens/edinburgh

     

    The Writers’ Museum

    A number of authors have hailed from Scotland’s capital, and the Writers’ Museum pays tribute to three of the most famous - Robert Burns, Sir Walter Scott and Robert Louis Stevenson. The museum contains personal memorabilia, portraits, rare books and more.

     

    Website: https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venue/writers-museum

     

    Waverley Mall

    Located near historic Princes Street with its view of Edinburgh Castle, Waverley Mall is a great place to do some shopping in the city. There’s a huge range of high street and independent stores to browse, as well as restaurants and cafes for refreshments.

     

    Website: https://www.edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venue/writers-museum

     

    Facts About Edinburgh

    • Edinburgh’s ancient castle was built on top of an extinct volcano!
    • JK Rowling wrote parts of Harry Potter in Edinburgh, and was inspired heavily by the local architecture and landscape
    • The first municipal fire service in the world was founded in Edinburgh in 1824
    • The first Encyclopaedia Britannica was produced in Edinburgh - and was originally thought to be quite racy! The anatomy section caused controversy as it contained “unvarnished portrayals of the unmentionable parts of the human body”
    • One of the penguins at Edinburgh Zoo - fantastically named Sir Nils Olav - is the Colonel-in-Chief and mascot of the Norwegian Royal guard. Sir Nils is the world’s only knighted penguin!

     

    This year Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union is running a trip to Edinburgh on 16th November 2018 as part of their Give It A Go Scheme. 

    Book your tickets here

  • Fri 07 Sep 2018 15:40

    Suitcase

    1. When you become a student at Sheffield Hallam, you automatically become a member of your Students' Union. We are one big happy family here!

    That's right, the moment you accept your offer at Sheffield Hallam Uni, you automatically become a member of Sheffield Hallam Students' Union. Welcome to the family! 

     

    2. We have a FREE shuttle bus for Hallam students that goes between City and Collegiate campuses

    This is a firm favourite with our students! Hallam students kept asking for a shuttle bus that runs between City and Collegaite campus and your Student Officers made it happen! This brings me on to my next point...

    3. The Students' Union is headed by 5 full time Student Officers

    Every year your Students' Union holds an Election where you, the students, vote in the students that you want to represent you during your time at Hallam. If you want to take on the role of representing 35,000 students and leading a multi-million pound organisation, make sure to nominate yourself when nominations open in January. In the meantime if you want to learn more about this or anything else, just pop in and ask us! Our building (pictured above) is pretty hard to miss!

    4. We jointly run a safe taxi scheme with City Taxis because our students' safety is paramount! 

    If you ever find yourself out late with no money on you, don't walk home and risk your safety, simply call City Taxis and quote the 'safe taxi scheme'. You will need to give the driver your student card, which you can collect 48 hours later from the Students' Union in exchnage for your cash payement.

    5. You can get FREE printing at the Students' Union

    Yup that's right. You simply need to download the printt app and then send your documents to print! It's easy peasy!

    6. Your Students' Union offers halal food

    No need to miss out when all your friends are eating that juicy hotdog because you can enjoy our equally juciy halal version! 

    7. We have a multi-faith prayer room in the Students' Union

    It is located towards the back of the Students' Union and is open to all faiths. A member of reception staff can show you to it if you don't know where to find it.

    8. Your Students' Union shop is your one stop shop for all things Hallam branded! We sell everything from gym gear to hoodies and everything else in between!

    The Stall is our Students' Union clothing shop where you can get all your Hallam branded merch from. You can buy hoodies, t-shirts, gym gear, bags, baseball caps and so much more! The Stall is also the box office for Varsity tickets.

    9. You can get food and drink pretty cheap from Hideout and Coffee Union - our bar and coffee shop

    You just need to check out Hideout and Coffee Union's menus and your mouth will start watering! Make sure to get down here and try it out. 

    10. We are a social enterprise

    This means that the money you spend in Coffee Union, Hideout and other services goes back into helping your Students' Union provide the services that you want.

    11. We sell and print Totum cards (formerly known as NUS Extra cards) at the Students' Union so you can start saving straight away! 

    Just in case you are aware, the NUS Extra card has had a bit of a brand refresh. It is now called totum and looks like the above. This is one of the most valuable purchases that you will make during your time at uni. The good news is you no longer have to order it online and wait for the postman to deliver it, because we print them at the Students' Union so you can buy your card and walk away with it within minutes! 

    12. We have laptops in the HUBS that all students can loan out

    These laptops are located in the Students' Union on the first floor. To borrow a laptop all you need is your SHU card. It couldn't be easier! 

    13. We have a free and independent Advice Centre

    The Student Advice Centre, located upstairs on the first floor, is a service worth knowing about. If you ever have any problem what so ever, no matter how big or small, they can help you with it. It is also worth noting that the Student Advice Centre is a hate crime reporting centre too, so if you see it, say it and we'll sort it.

    14. We are NOT the university

    We are in fact two separate entities that often work together because at the end of the day, you (our students), are at the centre of both our worlds.

    15. The opportunities are endless with your Students' Union

    When we say they are endless, we really do mean it! We have so much to offer all our students, no matter what you are in to. We have hundreds of volunteering opportunities for you to try out, we have students jobs, we having some cracking nights on in Hideout every week, we have a load of FREE training courses that you can sign up to, hundreds of socieites for you to join, student placements, you can run the Students' Union and get paid for it! The list could honestly go on and on! Get in touch with us to see how you can beneift from your Students' Union!

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 15:13

    Suitcase

    Pack Your Bags

    If you’re moving away from home for the first time, packing for university can seem a little intimidating - but don’t worry! We’ve put together a checklist of essentials so you can be sure you have everything you need.

    We've also put together a printable version of this checklist - download it here!

     

    Clothes

    While it might be tempting to take your entire wardrobe with you, try and only take the clothes you need. You might not have that much storage space, and you can always pick up more things when you visit home. Make sure you have plenty of comfy clothes for long days on campus as well as things to wear on nights out!

    • Socks and underwear
    • Everyday clothes
    • Warm jumpers/hoodies
    • Coats (at least one waterproof)
    • Pyjamas
    • Going out clothes
    • Shoes
    • Accessories
    • Bags

    Toiletries

    You might decide to stock up on these essentials when you get to Uni instead of bringing them with you, but it’s still important to make sure that you’re not missing anything. Make sure you have a good supply of any medication that you need, and find out where you can stock up soon after you arrive.

    • Toothbrush
    • Toothpaste
    • Shower gel
    • Shampoo
    • Deodorant
    • Hairbrush/Hair products
    • Sanitary products
    • Makeup
    • Skincare
    • Razors/Shaving cream
    • Medication
    • Plasters
    • Painkillers

    Homeware/Kitchenware

    Every halls is different, so if you’re able to visit before you move make sure to take a note of what furniture and utensils are provided and what you need to bring with you (particularly kitchen supplies). It’s still a good idea to bring some of your own crockery - it can prevent arguments about whose washing up is in the sink!

    • Duvet/pillows/covers
    • Laundry basket
    • Wastepaper basket
    • Coat hangers
    • Clothes horse
    • Crockery
    • Basic kitchen equipment (optional)

    Personal Things

    While you don’t need to bring all of your keepsakes with you, it can be comforting having a few little reminders of home around you.

    • Photos
    • Soft toys
    • Books

    Electronics

    While packing electronics, don’t forget to make sure you have any necessary chargers, extension cables and batteries for them. Invest in a surge protected extension lead to make sure you have enough available plug sockets in your room.

    • Laptop
    • TV/Game console
    • Chargers
    • Extension cables/Power extension leads
    • Alarm clock
    • Hairdryer/Straighteners

    Documents

    Keep all of your important paperwork together so you can find it easily - pick up a cheap folder or box file you can store things in.

    • Passport/Driver’s Licence
    • Bank statements
    • University paperwork
    • Accommodation information
    • SFE Paperwork
    • Medical paperwork
    • Visa/travel documents (for International Students)

    Stationary

    Even if you’re planning on using a laptop to take notes in class, it’s still a good idea to have a supply of stationary on hand just in case.

    • Notebooks
    • Pens
    • Diary

    Packing for Uni Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 14:58

    Cooking at Uni

    For many new students, cooking for themselves is a totally new experience. It’s no coincidence that the phrase ‘student food’ usually brings to mind instant noodles and cereal for dinner! But cooking doesn’t have to be difficult, expensive or time-consuming, and  at the end of a long day on campus there’s nothing better than a home cooked meal.

    We’ve put together recipe cards for five simple, versatile meals that you can make easily on a budget - and a blank one so you can start building your own recipe collection! Print them out and keep them in your kitchen so they’re right there when you need them.

    All these recipes feed four hungry people (if you want to be the most popular person in halls!) but they can be halved easily for smaller portions.

    You can download a printable version of these recipe cards (plus a blank one for your own kitchen creations) here!

    Spaghetti Bolognese Recipe Card

    Thai Green Curry Recipe

    Veggie Fajitas Recipe Card

    Leek and Potato Soup Recipe Cards

    Apple Crumble Recipe Card

    Five Simple Recipes Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 14:26

    Hand Holding Phone

    Missing Home

    Starting university is an exciting time. There are new places to explore, new people to meet and new things to do. You’re expected to have the time of your life as a student, especially during Freshers’ Week - however, not everyone settles into student life so easily. In fact, research shows that up to 70% of students will experience homesickness in their early days at university.

    Many people feel guilty or left out if they experience homesickness. That doesn’t have to be the case, though - feeling homesick is perfectly normal, and there are plenty of things you can do if you’re struggling.

    What Can I Do?

    • Talk to people - It’s likely that you’re not the only person in your social circle who is missing home. If you feel comfortable doing so, chat to your flatmates or people on your course about how you’re feeling. You might be surprised by how many of them are going through the same thing, and you can find ways to support one another. Don’t feel like you’re limited to making friends with other students, either. Check out the Meetup website to find social events in your area, where you can meet other people who share your interests.

    • Keep in contact (within reason) - Calling or visiting home can help with feelings of homesickness, but these things can actually have an adverse effect if you do them too often. Try and schedule phone calls - perhaps every other day for the first few weeks - and set a date for your first visit so you have something specific to look forward to. When you’re chatting to friends and family from home, try not to focus exclusively on how much you’re missing them. Talk to them about positive experiences too - if you’ve been to an event or made a new friend, let them know about it!

    • Establish a routine - When you’re settling into a new place it can be really helpful to have a set routine. Take a look at your timetable, get to know the route to campus and find out where your local amenities like shops and cafes are. Try and get up at the same time every day and familiarise yourself with the local area - these little things can help make a new city feel like home.

    • Enjoy your experience - It’s much easier to deal with feelings of homesickness if you’re keeping busy and having fun. The Students’ Union offers loads of activities and opportunities for students, and they’re a great way to get out and meet people. Organise things that you can look forward to - go on a day trip with Give It A Go, join one of over 100 societies or arrange a one-off volunteering session. All of these things can help you feel more at home in Sheffield, and can get you excited about student life!

    Where Can I Get Help?

    • On Campus - Located in the Surrey building on Hallam’s City Campus, the Student Wellbeing service is there to support students with their mental health. If you’d like to speak to a Wellbeing practitioner about feeling homesick, pop into the reception or contact them on 0114 225 2136 or at student.wellbeing@shu.ac.uk to arrange an appointment.

    • Online - Big White Wall is a fantastic online mental health and wellbeing service. It’s easy to use, totally free and completely anonymous. Access online courses and self-help materials, chat to other users in a safe environment and express your thoughts and feelings through creative outlets.

    • Over The Phone - Nightline is a student-run, confidential and anonymous listening and information service. Their phone lines are open from 8pm to 8am every night during term time, and they run instant messaging, email and text services too. You can call Nightline on 0114 222 8787, or visit their website for more information. No problem is too small or too silly, so if you find yourself needing a chat don’t be afraid to give them a ring.

    You’re Not Alone

    Homesickness isn’t just a problem that affects new students, either. You might have a brilliant time when you first get to university, then find yourself missing home later in the year. Some people don’t get homesick until they’re in their second or third year. No matter when these feelings affect you, there is support in place for you whenever you need it. Don’t be afraid to ask for help - homesickness is a really common issue, and there are loads of resources in place if you need them!

    Homesickness Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 14:18

    Group of Students

    Home Sweet Home

    There are a number of reasons why some students choose to live at home instead of moving into halls. Mature students might already live in the area, and students who live within travelling distance might prefer to commute instead of relocating.

    While there are a number of benefits to living at home - saving money on rent and staying somewhere that you feel comfortable, to name just a couple - some students find it harder to engage in university life when they’re not living in halls. Don’t worry - we’ve got some top tips to make the most of your student experience when you’re living at home.

    Making Friends

    • Use Social Media - There are a number of Facebook groups for Hallam students, including ones specifically for new starters, commuters and mature students. Chatting online before you arrive is a great way to meet people. There are commuter breakfast events at The HUBS throughout Welcome Week - why not arrange to meet a few new friends there?

    • Spend Time On Campus - It might be tempting to rush back home after lectures, particularly if you have trains or buses to catch, but try and spend a little more time on campus where you can. Grab lunch with your coursemates, or see if there are any events on at the Students’ Union you could attend during your breaks.

    • Speak To Your Reps - As well as five full time officers, the Students’ Union also has twelve part time student reps who are elected to represent your interests. There are reps for mature students, international students, part time students and others. If you’re having any concerns, contact your appropriate rep for a chat. They’re there to help you get the best out of your university experience. See who represents you here.

    Activities

    • Joining A Society - There are over 100 societies at Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union, so you’re sure to find something that interests you! Many students who live at home avoid joining societies because they’re not available in the evening - but don’t let that put you off. You can contact societies through the Students’ Union website, so why not get in touch and find out if there are daytime events or socials that you could come along to? Find out what’s on offer here.

    • Get Involved With Volunteering - The volunteering team at Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union offers a huge range of opportunities in and around the city. Students who don’t live on campus might be worried about the time and travel commitments of a regular volunteering placement, but there are plenty of other ways to get involved. Speak to the team about one-off events and fundraising - there’s plenty of ways to help out that can fit around your schedule. Click here to find out more.

    • Give It A Go - The Students’ Union Give It A Go scheme hosts loads of events throughout the year, both at The HUBS and at Collegiate Campus. Plenty of these happen in the day, so they’re accessible to students who go straight home after lectures. Events in previous years have included art sessions, craft and vintage markets, table tennis tournaments and more. The Give It A Go team are always keen to hear what you would like to see happening - if you have any ideas for events, let them know!

    Part Of A Community

    At Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union, we want to make sure that every student feels like part of our community. From the Hideout Bar and Coffee Union to the Student Advice Centre, all of our resources are available to all students, regardless of their circumstances.

    Make sure to make the most of everything that’s there for you. Being a student is a really exciting time, and we’re here to make sure you have the best experience possible!

     

    Living at Home Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 14:10

    Hand Holding Keys

    House Hunting 101

    For many students, coming to university means a whole host of new experiences - new friends, new activities, new classes - and for many it’s also their first experience of living away from home. Finding housing can seem like a daunting task for students, particularly if you’re going to be living with other people.

    There are a number of issues that can arise if you’re not prepared, but we’ve got some top tips to help make house hunting and living with flatmates much less stressful.

    Don’t Rush

    • Many new students feel pressured into finding a house for second year as soon as they start at university. This can lead to picking unsuitable properties, choosing housemates you don’t know very well, and getting into contracts you don’t understand. But there’s no need to rush. There are loads of student properties available in Sheffield throughout the year, and you won’t lose out if you don’t find something early on.

    • The Students’ Union runs a housing fair at The HUBS in November, where you can get advice and meet trustworthy, Snug-approved landlords, with no pressure to sign anything on the day. Read more about the Snug scheme here.

    Check Your Paperwork

    • When you find a house, the landlord will give you a tenancy agreement to sign. Depending on the situation, this might be a joint tenancy (where all housemates are responsible for paying the rent collectively and all are jointly and severally liable for the rent in law ) or a single tenancy (where you are responsible for paying your own share of the rent) - make sure you know which is which.

    • The Student Advice Centre at The HUBS offers a free tenancy checking service. Drop in and go through your paperwork with them before you sign any contracts - it will give you peace of mind and can prevent issues arising later.

    Set Ground Rules

    • When you move into your new property, make sure that you and your new housemates set some ground rules right away. Establish when guests are allowed over, talk about how you’re going to manage noise levels, and work out a fair rota for doing household chores. These might seem like boring conversations to have with your new housemates, but they can save a lot of problems moving forward.

    Dealing With Issues

    • If issues with your housemates do arise, try and deal with them as promptly and directly as possible. While it might be tempting to text your mate complaining about your housemate never doing the washing up, it won’t actually fix anything. Talk to your housemates if you have a problem - stay calm, explain your problem clearly, and try and avoid arguments if at all possible. If the problem continues, organise a meeting so you and your housemates can discuss any issues you have. It’s likely that someone will take a complaint more seriously if it comes from a group rather than an individual.

    Wanting To Leave

    • In the worst case scenario, some students may wish to leave their property altogether. This can be difficult, as most contracts will stipulate how many months your tenancy is supposed to last. There might be a break clause, or you might be able to negotiate with your landlord or find your own replacement, but every situation is different. Breaking your contract early can also be expensive, and might cause financial issues moving forwards. If you’re considering leaving your property, come to the Student Advice Centre and speak to an advisor. They can offer information and guidance on housing issues, and you don’t need to book an appointment in advance. Drop in at The HUBS from 10-4 Monday-Friday (12-4 Thursday) or at Collegiate on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 12-3. Alternatively, you can contact the Student Advice Centre online.

    Love Where You Live

    Finding a place to live might seem scary at first, but if you take your time and get the right advice it can be a really rewarding experience. These skills won’t just be useful at uni - being a savvy house hunter will benefit you for the rest of your life!

    Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union wants you to Love Where You Live - check out the Student Advice Centre's Housing page for more information, tips and advice.

    House Hunting Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 13:05

    Popcorn

    Something Different

    Sheffield is a great place to be a student. There are around 60,000 people studying in the city, and there are plenty of clubs and events catering to all your nightlife needs. But while you’re likely to go on a lot of nights out during your time at uni, there will probably be days when you feel like doing something a bit more low-key.

    Luckily, Sheffield has you covered. There are loads of cinemas, galleries and theatres around the city for when you fancy something a bit different, and loads of them have cheap rates for students. Here’s a quick selection of places to go for a culture fix.
     

    Live Music

    Skiddle - Gig ListingsSheffield Leadmill

    Skiddle is not a gig venue, but a fantastic website that collects all your local gig listings in one place. It’s easy to search for the kind of music that you like, and to check specific dates to see what’s on. Sheffield has a fantastic music scene, so be sure to make the most of it while you’re here!

    Website

    The Leadmill

    The Leadmill first opened in 1980, making it Sheffield’s longest running live music venue. It has won a number of awards, and is frequently voted the best venue in Sheffield. In 1983 the Leadmill booked the then-unknown singer Madonna to play at the venue - but cancelled the show due to a disagreement over money!

    Website

    Abbeydale Picture House/Picture House Social

    Located in Sheffield’s leafy Nether Edge district, Abbeydale Picture House and Picture House Social are unique adjoining venues that host live music and film screenings in a Grade II listed building.

    Website

    O2 Academy Sheffield

    Housed in the building that was previously home to the famous Top Rank Suite, the venue reopened as the O2 Academy in 2008 and has since seen performances by artists such as Two Door Cinema Club, Ellie Goulding and Bring Me The Horizon.

    Website

    FlyDSA Arena

    As well as having live comedy, music and sport, the arena also hosts events such as Sheffield Film and Comic Con.

    Website

    Record Junkee

    This independent record store also has its own small live venue, hosting local bands and events.

    Website

     

    Cinemas

    ShowroomShowroom Cinema Sheffield

    The Showroom cinema is over the road from The HUBS, and shows a diverse and constantly changing selection of films. Alongside current releases the Showroom screens independent, international and classic cinema too. You can also pick up a free CINE26 card if you’re aged 26 or under - as well as collecting points and getting a free ticket on your birthday, the card also allows you to see ANY film at ANY time for only £4.50!

    Website

    CINE26

    There are a number of other cinemas conveniently located around central Sheffield, showing a variety of popular and independent films.

    The Light

    Odeon

    Curzon


    Theatre and Comedy

    Sheffield Theatres (The Crucible, The Lyceum, The Studio)Sheffield Crucible Theatre

    The Sheffield Theatres complex is the largest of its kind outside of London, and is located conveniently in the centre of town. The three theatres show a variety of performances, including contemporary theatre, musicals, stand up comedy and more. The Live for 5 scheme also allows 16-26 year olds to purchase select tickets for only a fiver - but check the website frequently, as they sell out quickly!

    Website

    Live for 5

    City Hall

    Sheffield’s City Hall has been hosting live music, comedy and performance in the city centre since 1932.

    Website

    Theatre Delicatessen

    Theatre Deli offers a constantly-changing roster of experimental, immersive and thought-provoking theatre at its new location near The Moor.

    Website

    The Montgomery

    Tucked away in Surrey Street near Hallam’s City Campus, The Montgomery is home to a great range of live shows and events.

    Website

     

    Galleries and Museums

    Millenium Gallery & Graves GalleryGraves Gallery Sheffield

    A stone’s throw from Hallam’s City Campus, both the Millenium and Graves galleries are totally free to visit and have a great selection of exhibits to explore. Check out the collections dedicated to metalwork or natural history at the Millenium Gallery, or go and see Turner Prize winner Grayson Perry’s famous ‘Comfort Blanket’ tapestry at the Graves Gallery.

    Millenium Gallery Website

    Graves Gallery Website

    National Emergency Services Museum

    The National Emergency Services Museum is the largest of its kind in the UK, and features a huge range of memorabilia from the police, fire and ambulance services.

    Website

    Kelham Island Museum

    Kelham Island Museum celebrates Sheffield’s industrial heritage, and is a fantastic journey back through the city’s history.

    Website

    Weston Park Museum

    Explore a variety of permanent and temporary exhibitions in this Grade II listed building, set in five hectares of beautiful parkland.

    Website

     

    Culture Vulture

    The arts and culture scene in Sheffield is hugely varied and vibrant, and there’s something for absolutely everyone. It’s also a great time to try something new - maybe you’ve never been to the theatre before, or wouldn’t usually choose to spend a weekend wandering around an art gallery.

    Independent venues such as Hagglers Corner, Foodhall and Roco Creative Co-op are always hosting new and exciting events - there’s sure to be something for everyone.

    With so many things to do in the city that are cheap or free, why not have a go at getting out of your comfort zone? You might be surprised by what you find!

    Arts and Culture Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 12:16

    Sheffield Peace Gardens

    1. A Green CityWeston Park Sheffield

    People often think of Sheffield as an industrial city, but it’s actually one of the greenest cities in the UK too! Sheffield has the highest ratio of trees to people in Europe - over two million across the city!

    2. Rolling Down The River

    The name Sheffield comes from the River Sheaf, one of several rivers that run through the city, along with the River Don and the River Loxley

    3. Heavy Metal

    You might have heard Sheffield being called the ‘Steel City’. It gained an international reputation for steel production in the 19th century, and its population boomed during the Industrial Revolution. Innovations developed in Sheffield include stainless steel and crucible (where the theatre gets its name from!)

    4. The Beautiful Game

    Sheffield is home to the world’s oldest football club - and its second oldest! Sheffield FC was founded in 1857, and Sheffield Hallam FC just three years later. Sheffield Hallam FC’s Sandygate Road pitch also was also named the oldest football ground in the world by the Guinness Book of Records.

    Today, Sheffield Wednesday and Sheffield United FC are the two biggest teams in the city - the Steel City derby is a huge local event!

    5. All The World’s A StageSheffield Crucible Theatre

    The Sheffield theatre complex is the largest in the UK outside of London. The Sheffield Lyceum, Crucible Theatre and Studio Theatre are located in Lyceum Square in the city centre and host a wide variety of plays and live performances.

    Sheffield Theatres also offer cheap theatre tickets for 16-26 year olds as part of their ‘Live for 5’ scheme - check out what’s on offer!

    6. Sheffield Stars

    Hollywood isn’t the only place in the world with a Walk of Fame - Sheffield has one too! The Sheffield Legends plaques outside the Town Hall pay tribute to local celebrities such as actor Sean Bean, Olympic athlete Jessica Ennis and astronaut Helen Sharman - who was the first ever Briton in space!

    7. Disco 2018

    Sheffield is well known for its music scene, and has produced such acts as Pulp, Def Leppard, Bring Me The Horizon, Arctic Monkeys and The Human League.

    Pulp frontman and Sheffield local Jarvis Cocker once felt out of a window on Division Street - there’s  plaque commemorating the event!

    8. Down and Out in Paris and Yorkshire

    George Orwell, the novelist famous for writing Animal Farm and 1984, once said of the city: "Sheffield, I suppose, could justly claim to be called the ugliest town in the Old World” - a bit harsh, but a lot has changed since he wrote this unflattering review in 1937!

    Take a look at Daniel Cook’s photographs of Sheffield and the surrounding area to see just how beautiful our city is.The HUBS

    9. A Study in Sheffield

    Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, worked as a doctor’s assistant in Sheffield in 1878. He supposedly took some inspiration from his time living in the area for his famous story The Hound of the Baskervilles

    10. Your Local Hub(s)

    Sheffield was once home to the National Centre for Popular Music, which was located in the avant-garde building which is now home to the HUBS - Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union’s HQ! Here you can have a drink at the Hideout bar, grab some lunch at Coffee Union, drop in to chat to our team about societies and volunteering, and much, much more! Visit our website for more information about the city and your Students’ Union!

     

    Top Ten Facts About Sheffield Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 10:59

    Mental Health HeaderFeeling Blue

    Experiencing mental health difficulties at university can be an isolating experience. It’s easy to feel like you’re alone, or that you’re the only one who is struggling. However, the truth is quite different. In a recent government survey, more than a quarter of university students reported that they suffered from a mental health problem. Anxiety and depression were the most common, while eating disorders, behavioural problems and learning difficulties were also highlighted as important issues.

    Starting university is a big upheaval for most students. Many are living away from home for the first time, getting used to the pressures of independent study and trying to make new friends. It’s a lot to deal with all at once, and it might feel overwhelming at times. Help is at hand, though. There are loads of resources available for students struggling with mental health problems, no matter how small they might feel to you.

    What Are The Issues?

    • Homesickness - Studies show that up to 70% of students will experience homesickness in their early days at university. It’s perfectly normal to miss your friends and family, or to worry about settling into a new city, but these feelings can also cause some people a great deal of distress.

    • Academic Pressure - 71% of surveyed students reported that university work was one of their main sources of stress. The transition from A Levels to Undergraduate can be a difficult one, and you might also be worried if you have taken a break from study or if this is your first time studying in the UK.

    • Social Life - There are a number of common social problems that might cause additional stress. Loneliness, arguments with friends and relationship problems can all have a negative impact on your mental health.

    Where Can You Find Support?

    • In A Crisis - If you’re experiencing suicidal thoughts or feel like you might be at risk of harming yourself, there are a number of things you can do. You can call Samaritans for free on 116 123 - they’re available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Their service provides confidential support for people in crisis. Alternatively, there are NHS services you can access if you require help from healthcare professionals - see the NHS Help with Suicidal Thoughts website for more information.

    • Counselling and Mental Health Support - Located in the Surrey building on Hallam’s City Campus, the Student Wellbeing service is there to support students with their mental health and make sure that they’re comfortable, healthy and happy. If you’d like to speak to a Wellbeing practitioner about any worries you’re having, pop into the reception or contact them on 0114 225 2136 or at student.wellbeing@shu.ac.uk to arrange an appointment.

    • Online Peer Support - Big White Wall is a fantastic online mental health and wellbeing service. It’s easy to use, totally free and completely anonymous. Access online courses and self-help materials, chat to other users in a safe environment and express your thoughts and feelings through creative outlets. Visit the website to find out more.

    • Over The Phone - Nightline is a student-run, confidential and anonymous listening and information service. Their phone lines are open from 8pm to 8am every night during term time, and they run instant messaging, email and text services too. You can call Nightline on 0114 222 8787, or visit their website for more information. No problem is too small or too silly, so if you find yourself needing a chat don’t be afraid to give them a ring.

    • Practical Advice - Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union Student Advice Centre is open weekdays 10am - 4pm (12pm – 4pm Thursdays) on the first floor of the HUBS and Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10am - 3pm at 202 Oaklands (Collegiate Campus). The service specialises in advice on financial matters, housing rights and academic issues, but you can drop in and speak to a member of the team about anything that’s concerning you and they will usually be able to help.  Advice is free, confidential, and independent from the University. They also have lots of self-help guides and can signpost to a number of other services on campus or around the city.

    You’re Not Alone

    It’s common to experience feelings of guilt or worthlessness if you’re suffering from a mental health issue. You might feel like your problems aren’t severe enough to warrant asking for help, or that you don’t deserve support, but this is never the case. No matter what you’re going through, these resources are there for you to access. No problem is too ‘small’ or ‘unimportant’ - if it’s impacting your happiness and quality of life, then you have a right to seek the help you need.

    Your time at university should be as rewarding and exciting as it can possibly be. We want all of our students to thrive, and we’re here to support you every step of the way.

    Other Resources

    SHU Student Wellbeing (Mental Health Support)

    SHU Disabled Student Support - Mental Health (Academic Support)

    SHSU Student Advice Centre (Wellbeing, Housing and Financial Support)

    Mental Health Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 10:44

    Bedroom With Fairy Lights

    Settling In

    For many students, going to university is also their first experience of living away from home. While it can be exciting to have your own place, it’s also easy to get a little homesick after moving into halls.

    One of the best ways to combat this is to make your space comfortable and welcoming. Putting some personal touches on your new flat will make it feel much more like home!

     

    1. Stick To The Rules

    Every accommodation will have different rules about decorating, so make sure you check these carefully before you start putting things up on your walls! If you’re allowed to, a few posters or pictures can brighten up your room in a matter of minutesSofa With Cushions

    2. Get Cosy

    A few pillows and a comfy throw rug will make your bedroom feel like somewhere you can really relax. Soft furnishings like this can be picked up super cheap from shops like Ikea, Dunelm or even Primark

    3. Picture Perfect

    It’s nice to have a few little reminders of home around you. Get a few of your favourite photos of friends and family printed out - you can pop these in cheap frames or even make a photo collage!

    4. Light It Up

    It’s a bit of a student bedroom cliche, but a few fairy lights go a long way! They don’t cost a lot and can make a room feel much more welcoming

    5. Green Fingers

    Having some greenery around can really brighten up a room. Succulents are especially cheap to buy and easy to tend to, and will live very happily on your windowsill

    6. Memory Lane

    A corkboard is a great investment, and some halls even provide these for you. Pin up any mementoes of your time at uni - photos, concert and cinema tickets, event flyers - as a reminder of the fun you’ve been having!

    7. Pillow TalkSucculents

    Try and get into the routine of making your bed every morning - it only takes a few seconds, but you might be surprised by how much of a difference it makes

    8. A Load of Rubbish

    Make sure you have both a laundry basket and a wastepaper bin in your room - and use them!

    9. Keep It Clean

    Don’t let cleaning jobs get on top of you. Try and do one small job a day - tidying your desk, doing your laundry, hoovering your floor, etc. - instead of having to do them all at once

    10. Many Hands Make Light Work

    Keeping shared spaces clean can be tricky, so it’s important to set some standards early on. Get together with your new flatmates and come up with a chore rota so everyone knows what to clean and when

    11. Retail Therapy

    If you need homeware for your halls, try and take a trip with all your housemates so you can decide on exactly what you need and  split the cost fairly

    12. No More Kitchen Nightmares

    Try and make sure that everyone is allocated their own fridge space. If you’re going to share things like milk and sugar, make sure everyone agrees to it in advance and knows when it’s their turn to stock up!

     

    Making Your Halls A Home

    Your new home shouldn’t just be somewhere that you eat and sleep - it should be somewhere that you feel safe, comfortable and happy too! Making sure you can settle into your space is great for your wellbeing, and putting your mark on a new place can be a lot of fun too.

    Making Your Halls A Home Graphic

  • Wed 25 Jul 2018 10:29

    Public Transport Graphic

    Getting Around Sheffield

    When you first come to a new city, getting used to the local public transport can seem a little overwhelming. However, once you’ve mastered getting around, Sheffield can be your oyster! We’ve put together an easy one-stop guide for student travel in the city.

    Free University Shuttle Buses

    Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union runs its own FREE shuttle bus service throughout term-time for all students with a SHU student card! The service runs on weekdays, and stops regularly at The HUBS and Collegiate Campus.

    Take a look at the website for more info and full timetables

    Buses

    Buses are probably the cheapest and easiest way to get around the city. The Buses for Sheffield partnership has coordinated the different services around the city in order to make bus travel easier and more accessible for everyone.

    More information on routes and fares can be found on the Buses for Sheffield website

    The First group offers frequent services for students, covering campuses and halls of residence

    Trams

    There are three tram routes in Sheffield, running regularly throughout the city. Notably, the Yellow Route tram is one of the easiest ways to get from the town centre to Meadowhall shopping centre if you feel like a day out!

    More information on routes and fares can be found on the Supertram website

    Student Fares for Buses and Trams

    Being a student has a lot of perks, and cheap travel is one of them! If you’re going to be travelling by bus or tram on a regular basis, consider investing in a discounted pass to save yourself time and money.

    Check out the Travel South Yorkshire site for a list of discounted tickets and passes available to students in Sheffield

    Trains

    While you might not be using trains regularly, it’s still worth investing in a railcard for day trips and visits home. A 16-25 railcard costs £30 and will save you ? on all rail fares - with the cost of train tickets rising all the time, it’s a worthwhile investment. Mature students fear not! This railcard is also available to students aged 26 or over if they are in full time education.

    Visit the National Rail website for more information

    Taxis

    It’s likely that you’ll be using a taxi service at some point when you’re at Uni - especially after nights out! Make sure to stay safe when travelling at night. Always check that your cab driver has proper identification, and travel with a friend whenever possible (this also applies with independent services like Uber).

    Need to get home after a night out, but don’t have any cash on you? No problem. The Students’ Union runs a Safe Taxi Scheme in partnership with City Taxis to ensure that no student is left stranded. If you call City Taxis and quote ‘Hallam Safe Taxi Scheme’ when you’re booking your cab you can use your SHU Card as a deposit - just pick it up from the HUBS in 48 hours and pay your fare then.

    Visit the Safe Taxi Scheme website for more information

     

    High Frequency Bus Map

  • Thu 19 Jul 2018 13:22

    For many students, going to university is also their first experience of living away from home. While it can be exciting to have your own place, it’s also easy to get a little homesick after moving into halls.

    One of the best ways to combat this is to make your space comfortable and welcoming. Putting some personal touches on your new flat will make it feel much more like home!

    Decorating Your Room

    • Every accommodation will have different rules about decorating, so make sure you check these carefully before you start putting things up on your walls! If you’re allowed to, a few posters or pictures can brighten up your room in a matter of minutes
    • Get cosy - a few pillows and a comfy throw rug will make your bedroom feel like somewhere you can really relax. Soft furnishings like this can be picked up super cheap from shops like Ikea, Dunelm or even Primark
    • It’s nice to have a few little reminders of home around you. Get a few of your favourite photos of friends and family printed out - you can pop these in cheap frames or even make a photo collage!
    • It’s a bit of a student bedroom cliche, but a few fairy lights go a long way! They don’t cost a lot and can make a room feel much more welcoming
    • Having some greenery around can really brighten up a room. Succulents are especially cheap to buy and easy to tend to, and will live very happily on your windowsill
    • A corkboard is a great investment, and some halls even provide these for you. Pin up any mementoes of your time at uni - photos, concert and cinema tickets, event flyers - as a reminder of the fun you’ve been having!

     

    Keeping Clean

    • Keeping your bedroom tidy is a great habit to get into, and having a well-organised space will make you feel much more calm and focused when you need to study!
    • Try and get into the routine of making your bed every morning - it only takes a few seconds, but you might be surprised by how much of a difference it makes
    • Make sure you have both a laundry basket and a wastepaper bin in your room - and use them!
    • Don’t let cleaning jobs get on top of you. Try and do one small job a day - tidying your desk, doing your laundry, hoovering your floor, etc. - instead of having to do them all at once

     

    Shared Spaces

    • Keeping shared spaces clean can be tricky, so it’s important to set some standards early on. Get together with your new flatmates and come up with a chore rota so everyone knows what to clean and when
    • If you need homeware for your halls, try and take a trip with all your housemates so you can decide on exactly what you need and  split the cost fairly
    • Try and make sure that everyone is allocated their own fridge space. If you’re going to share things like milk and sugar, make sure everyone agrees to it in advance and knows when it’s their turn to stock up!

     

    Making Your Halls A Home

    Your new home shouldn’t just be somewhere that you eat and sleep - it should be somewhere that you feel safe, comfortable and happy too! Making sure you can settle into your space is great for your wellbeing, and putting your mark on a new place can be a lot of fun too.

  • Thu 19 Jul 2018 13:21

     

    A Green City

    People often think of Sheffield as an industrial city, but it’s actually one of the greenest cities in the UK too! Sheffield has the highest ratio of trees to people in Europe - over two million across the city!

     

    Rolling Down The River

    The name Sheffield comes from the River Sheaf, one of several rivers that run through the city, along with the River Don and the River Loxley

     

    Heavy Metal

    You might have heard Sheffield being called the ‘Steel City’. It gained an international reputation for steel production in the 19th century, and its population boomed during the Industrial Revolution. Innovations developed in Sheffield include stainless steel and crucible (where the theatre gets its name from!)

     

    The Beautiful Game

    Sheffield is home to the world’s oldest football club - and its second oldest! Sheffield FC was founded in 1857, and Sheffield Hallam FC just three years later. Sheffield Hallam FC’s Sandygate Road pitch also was also named the oldest football ground in the world by the Guinness Book of Records.

     

    Today, Sheffield Wednesday and Sheffield United FC are the two biggest teams in the city - the Steel City derby is a huge local event!

     

    All The World’s A Stage

    The Sheffield theatre complex is the largest in the UK outside of London. The Sheffield Lyceum, Crucible Theatre and Studio Theatre are located in Lyceum Square in the city centre and host a wide variety of plays and live performances.

     

    Sheffield Theatres also offer cheap theatre tickets for 16-26 year olds as part of their ‘Live for 5’ scheme - check out what’s on offer here: https://www.sheffieldtheatres.co.uk/your-visit/young-people/16-26-year-olds

     

    Sheffield Stars

    Hollywood isn’t the only place in the world with a Walk of Fame - Sheffield has one too! The Sheffield Legends plaques outside the Town Hall pay tribute to local celebrities such as actor Sean Bean, Olympic athlete Jessica Ennis and astronaut Helen Sharman - who was the first ever Briton in space!

     

    Disco 2018

    Sheffield is well known for its music scene, and has produced such acts as Pulp, Def Leppard, Bring Me The Horizon, Arctic Monkeys and The Human League, Def Leppard, BMTH etc (maybe just mention a couple more?

     

    Pulp frontman and Sheffield local Jarvis Cocker once felt out of a window on Division Street - there’s  plaque commemorating the event!

     

    Down and Out in Paris and Yorkshire

    George Orwell, the novelist famous for writing Animal Farm and 1984, once said of the city: "Sheffield, I suppose, could justly claim to be called the ugliest town in the Old World” - a bit harsh, but a lot has changed since he wrote this unflattering review in 1937!

     

    Take a look at Daniel Cook’s photographs of Sheffield and the surrounding area to see just how beautiful our city is: https://danscape.co/best-photos-of-sheffield/

     

    A Study in Sheffield

    Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, worked as a doctor’s assistant in Sheffield in 1878. He supposedly took some inspiration from his time living in the area for his famous story The Hound of the Baskervilles

     

    Sheffield was once home to the National Centre for Popular Music, which was located in the avant-garde building which is now home to the HUBS - Sheffield Hallam Students’ Union’s HQ! Here you can have a drink at the Hideout bar, grab some lunch at Coffee Union, drop in to chat to our team about societies and volunteering, and much, much more! Visit our website at https://www.hallamstudentsunion.com for more information about the city and your Students’ Union

     

  • Thu 19 Jul 2018 13:20

    Missing Home

    Starting university is an exciting time. There are new places to explore, new people to meet and new things to do. You’re expected to have the time of your life as a student, especially during Freshers’ Week - however, not everyone settles into student life so easily. In fact, research shows that up to 70% of students will experience homesickness in their early days at university.

    Many people feel guilty or left out if they experience homesickness. That doesn’t have to be the case, though - feeling homesick is perfectly normal, and there are plenty of things you can do if you’re struggling.

     

    What Can I Do?

    Talk to people - It’s likely that you’re not the only person in your social circle who is missing home. If you feel comfortable doing so, chat to your flatmates or people on your course about how you’re feeling. You might be surprised by how many of them are going through the same thing, and you can find ways to support one another. Don’t feel like you’re limited to making friends with other students, either. Check out http://www.meetup.com to find social events in your area, where you can meet other people who share your interests.

    Keep in contact (within reason) - Calling or visiting home can help with feelings of homesickness, but these things can actually have an adverse effect if you do them too often. Try and schedule phone calls - perhaps every other day for the first few weeks - and set a date for your first visit so you have something specific to look forward to. When you’re chatting to friends and family from home, try not to focus exclusively on how much you’re missing them. Talk to them about positive experiences too - if you’ve been to an event or made a new friend, let them know about it!

    Establish a routine - When you’re settling into a new place it can be really helpful to have a set routine. Take a look at your timetable, get to know the route to campus and find out where your local amenities like shops and cafes are. Try and get up at the same time every day and familiarise yourself with the local area - these little things can help make a new city feel like home.

    Enjoy your experience - It’s much easier to deal with feelings of homesickness if you’re keeping busy and having fun. The Students’ Union offers loads of activities and opportunities for students, and they’re a great way to get out and meet people. Organise things that you can look forward to - go on a day trip with Give It A Go, join one of over 100 societies or arrange a one-off volunteering session. All of these things can help you feel more at home in Sheffield, and can get you excited about student life!

     

    Where Can I Get Help?

    • On Campus - Located in the Surrey building on Hallam’s City Campus, the Student Wellbeing service is there to support students with their mental health. If you’d like to speak to a Wellbeing practitioner about feeling homesick, pop into the reception or contact them on 0114 225 2136 or at student.wellbeing@shu.ac.uk to arrange an appointment.
    • Online - Big White Wall is a fantastic online mental health and wellbeing service. It’s easy to use, totally free and completely anonymous. Access online courses and self-help materials, chat to other users in a safe environment and express your thoughts and feelings through creative outlets. Visit www.bigwhitewall.com to find out more.
    • Over The Phone - Nightline is a student-run, confidential and anonymous listening and information service. Their phone lines are open from 8pm to 8am every night during term time, and they run instant messaging, email and text services too. You can call Nightline on 0114 222 8787, or visit their website at www.sheffieldnightline.co.uk for more information. No problem is too small or too silly, so if you find yourself needing a chat don’t be afraid to give them a ring.

    You’re Not Alone

    Homesickness isn’t just a problem that affects new students, either. You might have a brilliant time when you first get to university, then find yourself missing home later in the year. Some people don’t get homesick until they’re in their second or third year. No matter when these feelings affect you, there is support in place for you whenever you need it. Don’t be afraid to ask for help - homesickness is a really common issue, and there are loads of resources in place if you need them!

    .

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